Dorothy “Dot” Lewis, far left, was one of the 1,830 Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPS, during WWII.
Her son shared his tribute to his mother with us. Read his and others’ tributes to veterans.

Dorothy “Dot” Lewis, far left, was one of the 1,830 Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPS, during WWII.

Her son shared his tribute to his mother with us. Read his and others’ tributes to veterans.

Chronic tinnitus affects millions of Americans. It’s the most widely reported disability among veterans (even more so than PTSD) and 2 million have it to a degree so severe, it’s debilitating.
Do you have it?

Chronic tinnitus affects millions of Americans. It’s the most widely reported disability among veterans (even more so than PTSD) and 2 million have it to a degree so severe, it’s debilitating.

Do you have it?

Has a veteran made a difference in your life?

This Veterans Day, we’re collecting your stories, big and small, about veterans who have impacted your life.

Share your stories and photos with us here and they could be featured in our online feature.

Almost one million veterans are waiting for their benefit claims to be processed, according to an investigation by the Center for Investigative Reporting. One regional office in North Carolina was so overrun with claims folders that the sheer weight of their content exceeded the load-bearing capacity of the building itself.

These photos were included in a 2012 report from the Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General. To see more photos and learn more about the backlog, go here.

Nearly 250,000 veterans wait more than a year for their medical claims to wind through the Veterans Administration before receiving their earned benefits, according to an investigation conducted by the Center for Investigative Reporting. 
Watch the interviews with Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki and three vets about the benefits backlog here.

Nearly 250,000 veterans wait more than a year for their medical claims to wind through the Veterans Administration before receiving their earned benefits, according to an investigation conducted by the Center for Investigative Reporting.

Watch the interviews with Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki and three vets about the benefits backlog here.

"

They wrote that dubbing the condition an injury instead of a disorder meant “we physicians believe that brain physiology has been injured by exposure to some external force, not that we are just anxious or depressed by tragic and traumatic reality.”

"The person is not ‘disordered’ but a brain function is injured," the two psychiatrists wrote. "It no longer works the way it used to."

"

Leaders in the psychiatric profession are pushing for an alternative name for post-traumatic stress disorder in an effort to reduce the stigma for military service members and veterans. But there is still no agreement among mental health luminaries and those with wartime experience about what the alternative should be — or even if there should be an alternative.

Read more

"There’s a lot of things that I’ve seen, a lot of things that veterans see during war in a combat zone that are honestly some of the ugliest things you would ever see, that you could ever even imagine — inhumane actions that are done by a veteran themselves that just make them feel like monsters," said Marine Corps veteran David Keefe. "The only people who are going to understand are veterans themselves. They feel like a community, so they can integrate into society."

Combat Paper: Veterans Battle War’s Demons With Paper-Making

RASUL By David KeefePrinted in January, 2012
"I couldn’t get over the fact that how much I looked like an alien to him. (I was) this big monster with all this gear on me, and this little kid was malnourished and (bowlegged). I remember going back to that same area a few times and seeing the same family just around. One time I went back and they were completely gone. … I don’t know what happened," Keefe said.
The Combat Paper Project allows veterans to repurpose uniforms into art, a process that has helped veterans make sense of their experiences in a constructive, safe and artistic environment.
Slideshow: Veterans Battle War’s Demons With Paper-Making
We’ll have more on Combat Paper tonight on NewsHour. 

RASUL 
By David Keefe
Printed in January, 2012

"I couldn’t get over the fact that how much I looked like an alien to him. (I was) this big monster with all this gear on me, and this little kid was malnourished and (bowlegged). I remember going back to that same area a few times and seeing the same family just around. One time I went back and they were completely gone. … I don’t know what happened," Keefe said.

The Combat Paper Project allows veterans to repurpose uniforms into art, a process that has helped veterans make sense of their experiences in a constructive, safe and artistic environment.

Slideshow: Veterans Battle War’s Demons With Paper-Making

We’ll have more on Combat Paper tonight on NewsHour. 

"…Oftentimes, the only acknowledgment I get is somebody handing me a handshake and saying, "Thank you for your service."
And I personally feel, if you are really grateful, go do something for a vet. Go volunteer for a charity. Go start one. Go help in some capacity.”
Four Iraq war veterans share their experiences and reflect on the personal impact of the nine-year war.

"…Oftentimes, the only acknowledgment I get is somebody handing me a handshake and saying, "Thank you for your service."

And I personally feel, if you are really grateful, go do something for a vet. Go volunteer for a charity. Go start one. Go help in some capacity.”

Four Iraq war veterans share their experiences and reflect on the personal impact of the nine-year war.