Coolidge High School graduate Chuck Gaines grew up moving from homeless shelter to shelter. Now, he is the first in his family to attend college. He credits a village of supporters who helped him get to where he is today, including his high school football coach, Natalie Randolph.

“A lot of people at Coolidge just helped me through everything I needed,” he says. “It’s a big family…That’s where my family is.”

Who are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?

Hey, remember this moment from 2006? 
Zidane headbutt immortalized by Algerian artist Adel Abdessemed at the Centre Pompidou art museum in Paris. 
(Photo by Mehdi FedouachAFP/Getty Images)

Hey, remember this moment from 2006? 

Zidane headbutt immortalized by Algerian artist Adel Abdessemed at the Centre Pompidou art museum in Paris. 

(Photo by Mehdi FedouachAFP/Getty Images)

"Technological advances like adding accelerometers inside helmets is not new; in fact, if a sideline doctor can get a page every time a player takes an exceptionally hard hit to the head, I imagine parents will receive alerts on their smartphones someday soon advising them to check on their star player after a big hit."

Hari Sreenivasan on a new study that shows kids who play football take hits to the head just as hard as any high school, college or NFL player. The research could have a long-lasting impact on how little kids suit up for football.

Watch Stone Phillip’s full report and join Phillips for a live chat today at 12 p.m. ET. 

New research shows kids who play football take hits to the head just as hard as any high school, college or NFL player.

Because they lack the protective neck and chest muscles of older players, young players are kind of like bobblehead dolls - the acceleration of each hit is greatly exaggerated. 

Watch Stone Phillips report on the findings. He also joins us for a live chat tomorrow at 12 p.m. ET.

Eastwood, America and ads that sell… but what?

theamericannow:

By Jeff Jones (2.7.2012)
 
Two minutes of sobriety may have been the real surprise winner on a Super Bowl Sunday that was otherwise exactly what we have come to expect: a glitzy half-time show and lots of sillycheeky ads. Then, just as the nation settled in for an exciting second half of football, it suddenly paused and held its collective breath.
 
If you haven’t seen the “Halftime in America” ad from Chrysler (aka the Clint Eastwood ad), take a moment to watch it below. It’s been the most talked-about commercial of the game. But most of the Monday morning quarterbacking has focused on unraveling some hidden political agenda.
 
My interest is different. Unlike most Super Bowl commercials,  this one seemed to try to capture a particular moment in America – something we’ve been calling “the American now.” But does it succeed? And if so, why? I put those questions to 40 sources from the Public Insight Network who list “advertising” as an expertise. Here’s some of what we heard…
 

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