As a result of climate change, melting arctic ice has opened new routes at the top of the world. A Chinese cargo ship set out last week in that nation’s first commercial voyage through the newly formed Northeast Passage.
Learn more here.

As a result of climate change, melting arctic ice has opened new routes at the top of the world. A Chinese cargo ship set out last week in that nation’s first commercial voyage through the newly formed Northeast Passage.

Learn more here.

How much water goes into ski resorts’ snow-making process? Check out this graph to put it into perspective and learn more here.

How much water goes into ski resorts’ snow-making process? Check out this graph to put it into perspective and learn more here.

climateadaptation asked: Hi there, I have the PBS Climate Widget on the front page of my tumblr. Will the widget be updated for 2013? Or do I have to reinstall a new one come 2013? Thanks a lot, love you guys! Michael

You shouldn’t have to change a thing; the widget should update in 2013 just as it does this year without any changes.

Love ya back,
NewsHour 

Animation by ciceroinfo. H/T Andy Revkin/NYT

Why haven’t we heard more about climate change during the national campaign?

Joseph Romm, Center for American Progress:

Well, of course, Mitt Romney gets a lot of money from fossil fuel interests. So, that’s one reason he even opposes a clean energy tax credit for wind.

Obama, I think, is just misreading the polls entirely…It’s when global warming becomes local that the public becomes concerned about it. And that’s why the polls in the last two years have shown the public is increasingly concerned, and this is particularly true of independent voters also. They are very concerned about their local pollution, but also the extreme weather that they have been seeing.

Who could miss 14 billion-dollar extreme weather disasters in this country last year and over seven this year? It’s just — you know, everyone sees the weather is going crazy, and it’s affecting them. It’s not going to be affecting a distant people in a distant land a distant time from now. It’s happening here now.

Are hurricanes linked to climate change?
(This polar map shows hurricane patterns since 1851. Image by John Nelson/IDVsolutions)
Kerry Emanuel, professor of atmospheric sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology:

"Hurricanes operate off of a difference between the temperature of the ocean and the temperature of the atmosphere…And as we add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, that temperature difference increases, and that tends to make hurricanes more powerful. That hurricane power during the period of really good observations - from about 1980 until now - has roughly doubled in the Atlantic. That’s a big signal."

Are hurricanes linked to climate change?

(This polar map shows hurricane patterns since 1851. Image by John Nelson/IDVsolutions)

Kerry Emanuel, professor of atmospheric sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology:

"Hurricanes operate off of a difference between the temperature of the ocean and the temperature of the atmosphere…And as we add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, that temperature difference increases, and that tends to make hurricanes more powerful. That hurricane power during the period of really good observations - from about 1980 until now - has roughly doubled in the Atlantic. That’s a big signal."

Brian Cladoosby, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community:

I’m not a scientist. I don’t know why climate change is happening. I don’t know if it’s just — if it’s just a cycle in the Earth, you know — it’s a generational thing, or if there’s too much pollution entering the atmosphere. And so when we’re seeing climate change impacts in our areas, we figure we better get ahead of the curve.

The Swinomish, or “Salmon People,” became the first tribe in the country to conduct a climate adaptation assessment that paired observations in their natural world with top scientific research. Melting glaciers in the Pacific Northwest could push salmon to the brink of extinction. For these Northwest tribes, this means fighting to preserve their way of life.

Time Lapse Reveals The Retreating South Cascade Glacier in Washington

Today, Pacific salmon are facing another threat could drive them to the brink of extinction. Salmon need the glacier-fed streams of the Northwest to survive, but since 1920, the average annual temperature in the region has risen by 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit. That slight increase in temperature has caused the glaciers of the South Cascades to shrink to half what they were a century ago, according to the United States Geological Survey.

Droughts Across the Decades

More than half of the continental United States was in moderate to extreme drought in June — including corn- and soybean-producing states — damaging crops and impacting prices at the grocery store.

Some say if the hot, dry weather continues, this year’s drought could rival the “dust bowl” years of the 1930s.

How are you feeling the heat where you live?

‘We’re really not werewolves’ 
The tiny, northwestern Quileute tribe, whose origin legends say they are descendents of a wolf pack, gained notoriety as the clan of shapeshifting werewolves who make a treaty with a group of vampires in the popular “Twilight” book and movie series.
Tribal members say it has brought many tourists and media attention to their reservation in La Push, Wash., which has helped them galvanize support for their land struggle.
More 

‘We’re really not werewolves’

The tiny, northwestern Quileute tribe, whose origin legends say they are descendents of a wolf pack, gained notoriety as the clan of shapeshifting werewolves who make a treaty with a group of vampires in the popular “Twilight” book and movie series.

Tribal members say it has brought many tourists and media attention to their reservation in La Push, Wash., which has helped them galvanize support for their land struggle.

More