The Great Recession hasn’t only affected families in terms of money. It’s also led to a six-fold increase in the chances of a child being physically abused. 
Learn more here. 

The Great Recession hasn’t only affected families in terms of money. It’s also led to a six-fold increase in the chances of a child being physically abused.

Learn more here. 

"The tragedy here is that they’re all too well aware that this isn’t good. So, what you see is children who know this isn’t the way it should be, but have no way of changing it for themselves." — Jezza Neumann, filmmaker
What can children tell us about growing up poor?

"The tragedy here is that they’re all too well aware that this isn’t good. So, what you see is children who know this isn’t the way it should be, but have no way of changing it for themselves." — Jezza Neumann, filmmaker

What can children tell us about growing up poor?

"As a student of the history of the book, I am fascinated by paratext and peritext; that is, everything in and about a book beyond the body of the text," Krissy Wilson, the creator of the Tumblr The Art of Google Books, in an interview with NewsHour Art Beat. 
"…To me, used books are infinitely more interesting than the kinds of books that collectors covet." 
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"As a student of the history of the book, I am fascinated by paratext and peritext; that is, everything in and about a book beyond the body of the text," Krissy Wilson, the creator of the Tumblr The Art of Google Books, in an interview with NewsHour Art Beat. 

"…To me, used books are infinitely more interesting than the kinds of books that collectors covet." 

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(Creative Commons photo courtesy flickr.com/fabrico/)
10 percent of infants and 20 percent of preschoolers are overweight, according to a new IOM report.
Here are 15 tips to combat obesity in babies from the IOM.

(Creative Commons photo courtesy flickr.com/fabrico/)

10 percent of infants and 20 percent of preschoolers are overweight, according to a new IOM report.

Here are 15 tips to combat obesity in babies from the IOM.

Saving: Brought To You By the Letter ‘S’

By Paul Solman

How to get us to save, the importance of self-control. Weighty issues deserving of discussion in the light of last Friday’s visit to Sesame Street. But what America wants to know, I’m guessing: What’s it like to interview Grover? (Not the tax-axing Norquist, of course, but the non-political blue blur of fur whose first name alone suffices, in the manner of Madonna, Bono, or Snuffleupagus.)

First fact: The interviewer must position himself above the duo that compromise the schtick figure, since Grover is animated from below and must be shot solo, lest the illusion of independence be shattered.

Second: Camera crews are obliged to hook up the video feed to a TV set, so that Gover’s lower half can watch the shooting as it happens, and reposition himself off-screen should and error occur. We had to reshoot one sequence when the brains of the operation bobbed up briefly into view.

Third: The master beneath the Muppet, Eric Jacobson, is only the second Grover in the 42-year history of the Street. The first: the legendary Frank Oz.

Fourth: No surprise, but Jacobson is one quick study, adapting quickly to questions that were in no way pre-arranged. Indeed, when we sprang the marshmellow test on the plucky pair, we knew that the sugar puffs were hardly PBS children’s fare. But the Blue Boy and his chaperone remained in character, and were graciously accommodating.
 
Fifth: Though I’ve watched Grover on TV for decades, he proved no more intimidating in person than any other famous interviewee, and in fact, seemed surprisingly unaffected by his celebrity.

Finally, sixth: He’s a regular Dorian Grey, that Grover. Now 42 years old, it’s simply amazing how little he’s aged. Or slowed down.

Video produced by Elizabeth Shell.

Note: For more on the Sesame Street savings program “For Me, For You, For Later,” click here: http://bit.ly/iwJDkp

The Key To a Successful Life?

If you were one of the 1000+ babies born at the Queen Mary Maternity Hospital in Dunedin, New Zealand in 1972-73, chances are you don’t have any secrets.

 Those babies (now pushing 40) have grown up as the most scientifically studied group of people in the world. Starting at age 3, and every couple of years since, they’ve had every aspect of their physical and mental health examined and reported on in over 1100 publications. The latest paper to make a splash was on self-control. Not surprisingly, perhaps, the Dunedin study subjects with the lowest self-control as children have the worst health as adults. But what intrigued us was the finding that self-control was also linked to financial health…which is why we went to Duke University last week to interview the study’s associate director, Terri Moffitt, for our story about money tips for tots.  

Watch the full episode. See more PBS NewsHour.

Here’s what was left on the cutting room floor:
 

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(photo by Talea Miller)
About 49 percent of children in Guatemala are chronically malnourished according to the World Food Program—the fourth highest rate in the world. In indigenous communities the rate is closer to 70 percent.
NewsHour Global Health reports from Guatemala

(photo by Talea Miller)

About 49 percent of children in Guatemala are chronically malnourished according to the World Food Program—the fourth highest rate in the world. In indigenous communities the rate is closer to 70 percent.

NewsHour Global Health reports from Guatemala