To study black holes, scientists flock to the ALMA Observatory atop a mountain in the middle of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile to get a better look at the sky.

Check out the time-laps video of the night sky from our reporters Joshua Barajas and Rebecca Jacobson. 

Learn more here.

Imagine grabbing a mosquito by the wings. Except the mosquito is in New York, and you’re working the controls from Los Angeles.

This is how to land on a comet as it hurls through space.

After a 10-year, 4-billion-mile journey, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta space probe has reached its final destination: comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Learn more.

kqedscience:

Artist Will Take a 13-Hour Watery Stand to Draw Attention to Rising Seas
“On August 15th, performance artist Sarah Cameron Sunde will stand in the San Francisco Bay for a tidal cycle of over thirteen hours. At high tide, she’ll be covered up to her neck. This is the third iteration of her 36.5 water project, which dramatizes the challenge of rising seas.”
Learn more from Danna Staaf at KQED Science.

When science meets art.

kqedscience:

Artist Will Take a 13-Hour Watery Stand to Draw Attention to Rising Seas

On August 15th, performance artist Sarah Cameron Sunde will stand in the San Francisco Bay for a tidal cycle of over thirteen hours. At high tide, she’ll be covered up to her neck. This is the third iteration of her 36.5 water project, which dramatizes the challenge of rising seas.”

Learn more from Danna Staaf at KQED Science.

When science meets art.

Tags: science cool

Scientists at the NIH are mapping the activity of thousands of individual neurons inside the brain of a zebrafish as the animal hunts for food.
Learn more.

Scientists at the NIH are mapping the activity of thousands of individual neurons inside the brain of a zebrafish as the animal hunts for food.

Learn more.

If you think all living things need oxygen to breathe, you’re thinking too much like a human.
It’s true that humans, along with mammals, birds, insects and fish, require oxygen for survival. But not bacteria. What bacteria lack in intellect, they make up for in extraordinary adaptability of their metabolism.
Learn more.

If you think all living things need oxygen to breathe, you’re thinking too much like a human.

It’s true that humans, along with mammals, birds, insects and fish, require oxygen for survival. But not bacteria. What bacteria lack in intellect, they make up for in extraordinary adaptability of their metabolism.

Learn more.

The 13,000-year-old wisdom tooth of a Native American teenage girl was pulled from an underwater cave below Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.
"This young woman’s misfortune, so long ago, provides us with new insights regarding the early people who populated the Americas," said Laura Zahn, senior editor at Science.
Learn more.

The 13,000-year-old wisdom tooth of a Native American teenage girl was pulled from an underwater cave below Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

"This young woman’s misfortune, so long ago, provides us with new insights regarding the early people who populated the Americas," said Laura Zahn, senior editor at Science.

Learn more.

Scientists create world’s tiniest 3-D glasses to show bugs 3-D movies.

This is real life, people.

Scientists create world’s tiniest 3-D glasses to show bugs 3-D movies.

This is real life, people.

Part of your body is going extinct right now

We’re not talking about your appendix.

We’re referring to microbes — a good bacteria that boosts your immunity, protects you from infection and produces the enzymes you need to digest your food.

But due to the overuse of antibiotics, C-sections and modern sanitation, humans in the U.S. have lost a third of their microbial diversity, mostly on their skin and in their stomachs and digestive tracts.

Learn more.

This sloth bear cub is being raised by zookeepers at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., after her mama ate her siblings.
And yes, this baby bear is in fact trying to kiss the camera.
Learn more about why mothers in the wild sometimes eat their babies.

This sloth bear cub is being raised by zookeepers at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., after her mama ate her siblings.

And yes, this baby bear is in fact trying to kiss the camera.

Learn more about why mothers in the wild sometimes eat their babies.