Big news! Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill have been named co-anchors and managing editors of PBS NewsHour.
This calls for a fist bump.

Big news! Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill have been named co-anchors and managing editors of PBS NewsHour.

This calls for a fist bump.

"I get concerned about journalism … I see a lot of false equivalence in the media and sometimes one side is just more right than the other side"

- Jill Murray, Alexandria, Virginia

Do you think the political system is broken?

"We’re talking about the loss of a kind of civic common in each of these communities."

David Carr of The New York Times on layoffs at The Times-Picayune.

After 175 years, one of the nation’s oldest daily newspapers announced that 200 staff members would lose their jobs this fall.

futurejournalismproject:

Meet the 1st-Grade Reporters Who Staff the Manatee Messenger

via PBS:

When my colleague Mike Fritz and I headed down to St. Petersburg, Fla., recently, we knew we were going to see young journalists at work. It’s not too hard to imagine that middle school students with a bit of training can write for a newspaper or even shoot video; plenty of kids have cellphones with cameras these days. But birthing journalists from first grade? I couldn’t imagine how it was done — until we arrived at Melrose Elementary, a journalism magnet school.

On a cool April morning the first graders from Teresa Scott’s class silently make their way into a multimedia classroom where they gather once a week. The question “What is a reporter?” was written on the white board in the front of the room. Most seemed already to have the answer.

First up on the agenda: a bit of review. Journalism teachers Carol Blair and Cynthia Vickers began by reinforcing an earlier lesson. In unison, as if they were reciting the Pledge of Allegiance, the students and teachers said: “A good journalist uses their brain, eyes, ears, nose and mouth to ask the five W’s: who, what, when, where and why.”


FJP:
 The video is simultaneously adorable and an eerie sort of indoctrination but we’ll keep this light. Here are some delightful highlights from our archival exploration of the Manatee Messenger

Omari Booker, a fifth- grader, is an unusually talented person. He can crack his wrist, wiggle his ears and rotate his eyeballs up inside his head, so all you can see is the white part. When asked about his talents, he said, “I don’t know how I do it. I guess I was just born this way.” 

Dear editor: 

I think we should have a chocolate fountain in the cafeteria so we can dip food in it and use it for a decoration. It would look pretty. The other thing we should change is to build a bigger and different playground. We need more room to play. When we play games now, we have to stay inside the edge of the playground where there is no equipment and there isn’t enough room to run.

Somewhere down they line, these Manatee Messengers end up in middle school, where the questions they ask become more than just “what is your favorite thing to do on Saturday? Sleep, play or go to Busch Gardens?

Check out this honest and striking video investigation, produced by eighth-grader De’Qonton Davis and his classmates at John Hopkins Middle School, on how neighborhood violence spills over to the classroom — a problem adults have been trying to deal with for years. More than 100 students were arrested in one year alone at John Hopkins, and these young journos decided to dig deep and investigate why. The video has already garnered local and national attention, but De’Qonton is still trying to get it to one person in particular…

De’Qonton Davis:

I want the president to see what I could do and see what — what young kids can do, young black American kids. And I want them to know that somebody out there is trying to learn and trying to get their education right and be a good adult dad in a community when he grows up.

Another day in the NewsHour control room
-TG

Another day in the NewsHour control room

-TG

"

Photography and journalism have made me a different person.

For the first time, I love telling stories because I can express myself through photos. It makes me want to come to school every day, and it has given me something that I’m really good at.

I like being able to tell stories without using words. I like being able to tell people things that are important in my life.

"

— De’Qonton, an eighth grader at John Hopkins Middle School (who produced the report Fighting Chance? Students Investigate Middle School Violence) on how journalism has made a difference in his life and in his schoolwork.

(Source: studentreportinglabs.com)

Mexico’s Drug War and The Cost of Journalism

Since 2006, an estimated 50,000 people have died in drug- and gang-related violence in Mexico — 49 of whom were found this weekend without heads, hands or feet outside Monterrey:

Ray Suarez: Has it been tougher to ask your journalists to go out into the field and cover this, when you know they’re taking their lives into their hands?

Alejandro Junco, owner of Grupa Reforma, one of the largest print media operations in Latin America: Well, I must tell you that I have a lot of respect and I have a lot of debt to a lot of journalists, a lot of men and women that pay the price, that run the risk.

And every day, they go out there and they know that, because we’re doing something that is important for our fragile democracy, you know, they continue to do it. But when you walk into the museum in Washington and you see the countries of the world there on a map, and you see our country, Mexico, in red, meaning that there is no freedom of expression, it breaks my heart.

And it’s painful to see that. But, on the other hand, I must agree because it has — the risk of publishing the truth, of going out there and reporting is getting higher.

There’s higher prices to be paid. There are more risks to be run, as we are seeing in the paper in the border in Nuevo Laredo. They simply stopped printing news that relate to organized crime.

Full interview 

Before His Death, Dawn Editor Razvi ‘Wouldn’t Leave Pakistan for the Moon’
"I have lived in several countries and felt at home; ditto for my wife," Murtaza Razvi wrote in an email to the NewsHour just two days before his brutal death. “But we’re raising our three daughters in Pakistan because if people like us left, we felt we’d be abandoning this country to the forces of darkness.
"We wouldn’t leave Pakistan for the moon, just yet. We holiday abroad to show the girls what the ‘normal’ world is like, and that we too should be like them. Of course, the girls will make their own choices when they grow up."
On Thursday, Razvi, the editor of the magazine section of Dawn Media Group in Karachi, was found in an office apartment building, apparently strangled to death. His death — though not connected at this point to his journalism — still serves as a reminder of the perils journalists face in the bustling port city of Karachi and elsewhere in Pakistan.
The Committee to Protect Journalists, which tracks journalism deaths around the world, ranked Pakistan as having the highest number in 2011 at seven. In 2012, it had eight. Journalists’ deaths where the motivation is connected to their work have been on the rise since 1992, the group has reported.
(Photo by Ann Hartman/East-West Center)

Before His Death, Dawn Editor Razvi ‘Wouldn’t Leave Pakistan for the Moon’

"I have lived in several countries and felt at home; ditto for my wife," Murtaza Razvi wrote in an email to the NewsHour just two days before his brutal death. “But we’re raising our three daughters in Pakistan because if people like us left, we felt we’d be abandoning this country to the forces of darkness.

"We wouldn’t leave Pakistan for the moon, just yet. We holiday abroad to show the girls what the ‘normal’ world is like, and that we too should be like them. Of course, the girls will make their own choices when they grow up."

On Thursday, Razvi, the editor of the magazine section of Dawn Media Group in Karachi, was found in an office apartment building, apparently strangled to death. His death — though not connected at this point to his journalism — still serves as a reminder of the perils journalists face in the bustling port city of Karachi and elsewhere in Pakistan.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, which tracks journalism deaths around the world, ranked Pakistan as having the highest number in 2011 at seven. In 2012, it had eight. Journalists’ deaths where the motivation is connected to their work have been on the rise since 1992, the group has reported.

(Photo by Ann Hartman/East-West Center)

An emerging trend across the country: requiring welfare recipients to pass a drug test. 
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An emerging trend across the country: requiring welfare recipients to pass a drug test. 

More

Posting this for two reasons:
1- to congratulate Gwen Ifill on being inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Hall of Fame.
2- so I’m not the only person with this song now stuck in my head. 
(You’re welcome ^TG)

Posting this for two reasons:

1- to congratulate Gwen Ifill on being inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Hall of Fame.

2- so I’m not the only person with this song now stuck in my head. 

(You’re welcome ^TG)