Health care costs eating your wallet?
"It’s almost like a video game, where you have to place patients, move patients, keep the flow going. And if you don’t, it stacks up, and then the waiting room backs up."

— Pete Nicks, director of “The Waiting Room,” a documentary that chronicles life at a large, under-resourced urban public hospital

They have the same options as everyone else in the federal government — no more, no less. All federal employees can access health care insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. That includes Supreme Court justices, members of the Senate, congressional aides and the janitorial staff in the Department of Health and Human Services. 

(Though the Supreme Court declined to provide specifics on the health plans of the individual justices or how many of them even participate in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. Some federal employees elect to receive their coverage elsewhere — through a spouse’s plan, for instance.)

Streaming live at 6 p.m. ET
We got you. 
Today at 1 p.m. we’re hosting a live chat with folks who know this stuff inside and out: 
NewsHour health correspondent Betty Ann Bowser.
Mary Agnes Carey, a reporter from Kaiser Health News.
Neera Tanden, president of the liberal think tank Center for American Progress and a former architect of the health care law.
Joseph Antos, a scholar in health care and retirement policy at the conservative American Enterprise Institute.
To participate, tweet us @newshour with #HCRchat.
To get you started - Supreme Court Reviews Health Care Form Law: a Guide to Day 2
Yesterday was about the “meat and potatoes" — establishing jurisdiction. Today, we get into the real issues on constitutionality: Can the federal government force Americans to buy health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t? 
-KC
?

We got you. 

Today at 1 p.m. we’re hosting a live chat with folks who know this stuff inside and out: 

To participate, tweet us @newshour with #HCRchat.

To get you started - Supreme Court Reviews Health Care Form Law: a Guide to Day 2

Yesterday was about the “meat and potatoes" — establishing jurisdiction. Today, we get into the real issues on constitutionality: Can the federal government force Americans to buy health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t? 

-KC

?

First sketches of the day by artist Bill Hennessy.
More coverage

First sketches of the day by artist Bill Hennessy.

More coverage

‎”I’m an avid patriot, and I believe that our country is on a terrible path, where socialism is encroaching,” Patrick Welsh of Lincoln University, Pa. said at a Tea Party rally Saturday. More portraits of Americans who oppose the Affordable Care Act(Photo by PBS NewsHour’s Victoria Fleischer)

‎”I’m an avid patriot, and I believe that our country is on a terrible path, where socialism is encroaching,” Patrick Welsh of Lincoln University, Pa. said at a Tea Party rally Saturday. 

More portraits of Americans who oppose the Affordable Care Act

(Photo by PBS NewsHour’s Victoria Fleischer)

Some are calling it the trial of the century - here’s a guide to Day 1 of the Affordable Care Act as it hits the Supreme Court. 

(Photos by @jasokane and @lornabaldwin)

-KC